Published & Accepted Papers

Blaney, J. M. (2018). Tapping into the leadership conceptions of undergraduate women in computing: A mixed-methods study. (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA. https://escholarship.org/uc/item/6j3368bf

Blaney, J. M. (2018, February). Looking beyond representation: How women develop their leadership perceptions during the introductory computing course. In Proceedings of the 49th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (pp. 453-458). New York, NY, USA: ACM. doi: 10.1145/3159450.3159458

Sax, L. J., Blaney, J. M., Lehman, K. J., Rodriguez, S. L., George, K. L., & Zavala, C. (2018). Sense of belonging in computing: The role of introductory courses for women and underrepresented minority students. Social Sciences, 7(8), 1-24. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7080122

Lehman, K. J. (2017). Courting the uncommitted: A mixed-methods study of undecided students in introductory computer science courses. (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.  http://escholarship.org/uc/item/94k326xs

Sax, L. J., Lehman, K. J., & Zavala, C. (2017). Examining the enrollment growth: Non-CS majors in CS1 courses. In Proceedings of the 2017 ACM SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (pp. 513-518). New York, NY, USA: ACM. doi: 10.1145/3017680.3017781

Sax, L. J., Zimmerman, H. B., Blaney, J. M., Toven-Lindsey, B., & Lehman, K. J. (2017). Diversifying computer science departments: How department chairs become change agents for women and underrepresented minority students. Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, 23(2), 101-119. doi: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.2017017221

Sax, L. J., Lehman, K. J., & Blaney, J. M. (2016). Building Recruiting and Inclusion for Diversity (BRAID): Emerging research on diversifying the CS major. Computing Research News, 28(3), 11-12.

Related Research on Computing

Rodriguez, S.L., & Lehman, K.J. (2018). Developing the next generation of diverse computer scientists: The need for enhanced, intersectional computing identity theory. Computer Science Education (pp. 1–20). doi: https://doi.org/10.1080/08993408.2018.1457899

Stout, J. G., & Blaney, J. M. (2018). “But it doesn’t come naturally”: How effort expenditure shapes the benefit of growth mindset on women’s sense of intellectual belonging in computing. Computer Science Education (pp. 1–14). https://doi.org/10.1080/08993408.2018.1437115

Blaney, J. M., & Stout, J. G. (2017). Examining the relationship between introductory computing course experiences, self-efficacy, and belonging among first-generation college women. In Proceedings of the 2017 ACM SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (pp. 69–74). New York, NY, USA: ACM. doi: 10.1145/3017680.3017751

Lehman, K. J., Sax, L. J., & Zimmerman, H. B. (2017). Women planning to major in computer science: Who are they and what makes them unique? Computer Science Education, 26(4): 277-298. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08993408.2016.1271536

Sax, L. J. (2017). Expanding the pipeline: Characteristics of male and female prospective computer science majors – Examining four decades of change.  Computing Research News, 29(2): 6-9. Link to Article.

Sax, L. J., Lehman, K. J., Jacobs, J. A., Kanny, A., Lim, K., Monje-Paulson, L. & Zimmerman, H. (2017). Anatomy of an enduring gender gap: The evolution of women’s participation in computer science. The Journal of Higher Education, 88(2): 258-293. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00221546.2016.1257306

Sax, L. J., Shapiro, C. A. & Eagan, M. K. (2011). Promoting Mathematical and Computer Self-Concept among Female College Students: Is there a Role of Single-Sex Secondary Education? Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, 17(4): 325- 355. doi: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.2011002386 

Additional Recent Research on STEM

Kim, Y. K., & Sax, L. J. (In press). The Effect of Positive Faculty Support on Mathematical Self-Concept for Male and Female Students in STEM Majors. Research in Higher Education, 1-31. doi: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11162-018-9500-8

Jacobs, J. A., Ahmad, S., & Sax, L. J. (2017). Planning a Career in Engineering: Parental Effects on Sons and Daughters. Social Sciences, 6(1), 2. doi: 10.3390/socsci6010002. 

Sax, L. J., Lehman, K., Barthelemy , R., & Lim, K. (2016). Women in Physics: A Comparison to STEM Over Four Decades. Physical Review Special Topics: Physics Education Research, 12(2). https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevPhysEducRes.12.020108

Sax, L.J., Kanny, A., Jacobs, J., Whang, H., Weintraub, D.S. & Hroch, A. (2016). Understanding the Changing Dynamics of the Gender Gap in Undergraduate Engineering Majors: 1971-2011. Research in Higher Education, 57(5): 570-600. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11162-015-9396-5

Sax, L. J., Kanny, M. A., Riggers-Piehl, T. A., Whang, H., & Paulson, L. N. (2015). “But I’m Not Good at Math”: The Changing Salience of Mathematical Self-Concept in Shaping Women’s and Men’s STEM Aspirations. Research in Higher Education, 56(8): 813-842. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11162-015-9375-x

Kanny, M. A., Sax, L. J. & Riggers-Piehl, T. A. (2014). Investigating Forty Years of STEM Research: How Explanations for the Gender Gap Have Evolved Over Time. Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, 20(2): 127-148. doi: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.2014007246 

Shapiro, C. and Sax, L. J. (2011). Major Selection and Persistence for Women in STEM. New Directions for Institutional Research, 152: 5-18. doi: 10.1002/ir.404